From the abstract:

Traditional surveys struggle to capture socially unacceptable attitudes such as racial animus. This paper uses Google searches including racially charged language as a proxy for a local area’s racial animus. I use the Google-search proxy, available for roughly 200 media markets in the United States, to reassess the impact of racial attitudes on voting for a black candidate in the United States. I compare an area’s racially charged search volume to its votes for Barack Obama, the 2008 black Democratic presidential candidate, controlling for its votes for John Kerry, the 2004 white Democratic presidential candidate. Other studies using a similar empirical specification and standard state-level survey measures of racial attitudes yield little evidence that racial animus had a major impact in recent U.S. elections. Using the Google-search proxy, I find significant and robust effects in the 2008 presidential election. The estimates imply that racial animus in the United States cost Obama three to five percentage points in the national popular vote in the 2008 election.

There’s more discussion at the Monkey Cage of the actual paper, but I’m interested in the above table, which ranks states by their interest in searching for “n*gger or N*ggers” on Google from January 2004-December 2007. WVa is the worst, Utah the best.  

From the abstract:

Traditional surveys struggle to capture socially unacceptable attitudes such as racial animus. This paper uses Google searches including racially charged language as a proxy for a local area’s racial animus. I use the Google-search proxy, available for roughly 200 media markets in the United States, to reassess the impact of racial attitudes on voting for a black candidate in the United States. I compare an area’s racially charged search volume to its votes for Barack Obama, the 2008 black Democratic presidential candidate, controlling for its votes for John Kerry, the 2004 white Democratic presidential candidate. Other studies using a similar empirical specification and standard state-level survey measures of racial attitudes yield little evidence that racial animus had a major impact in recent U.S. elections. Using the Google-search proxy, I find significant and robust effects in the 2008 presidential election. The estimates imply that racial animus in the United States cost Obama three to five percentage points in the national popular vote in the 2008 election.

There’s more discussion at the Monkey Cage of the actual paper, but I’m interested in the above table, which ranks states by their interest in searching for “n*gger or N*ggers” on Google from January 2004-December 2007. WVa is the worst, Utah the best.  

  1. thewyliecollective reblogged this from ilyagerner
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  7. laliberty reblogged this from ilyagerner and added:
    And you’re interested because it illustrates what, exactly? I see in your source box you wrote “Way to confirm my...
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  9. aceface905 reblogged this from ilyagerner and added:
    Fucking West Virginia. And we wonder why the Republicans want to make every election about Obama…
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